The National Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers (NCHEPM), announced the 2018 Hispanic Heritage Month theme: “Hispanics: One Endless Voice to Enhance our Traditions.”  The theme invites us to reflect on Hispanic American’s tradition, history and culture. 

The announcement was made during the Council’s March monthly meeting. NCHEPM members, associates, and partners from various federal agencies and affinity groups, including the general public, selected the theme through a voting process, which started in February 2018 with than 10 theme submissions. 

Aissha Hernandez-Ramos from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in San Juan, Puerto Rico submitted the winning theme, stating “Although Hispanics share so much, we do also have very unique characteristics; and that, enhances us as a group.  Our traditions will always be part of who we are.  As our history shapes our character; culture defines our beauty; and traditions will enhance our future.  History, culture and traditions define us; and we maintain alive because of that.  We will keep talking to the world, we will let them know we are here, with our history and culture, as we will keep raising our voice with all we are: a legacy of traditions.”

Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. 

The Hispanic Heritage observance began in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded by President Ronald Reagan in 1988 to cover a 30-day period starting on September 15 and ending on October 15.  It was enacted into law on August 17, 1988, on the approval of Public Law 100-402.

Local Celebrations:

Tuesday, September 25

Del Mar College Observance of Hispanic Heritage Month with Querer es Poder: Lieutenant Colonel Olga Custodio’s Quest to Democratize the Sky

In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, Del Mar College’s Social Sciences Department and the Mexican American Studies program present Querer es Poder: (Where There’s a Will There’s a Way) Lieutenant Colonel Olga Custodio’s Quest to Democratize the Sky. Dr. Erinn McComb, assistant professor of history, will discuss how Olga Custodio became the first Latina American woman to graduate from the United States Air Force, the first female pilot instructor of the supersonic T-38, one of the world’s most difficult jets to fly, and the first Latina commercial airline captain for American Airlines. The presentation outlines Custodio’s story as one that not only broke down barriers for women, but also one that gave visibility to Latina women in control of technology, specifically flight technology. This event is free and open to the public. Tuesday, Sept. 25, 1 p.m., Room 514, White Library, Del Mar College, East Campus, Naples at Kosar off Staples, free.

Thursday, October 4

Del Mar College Observance of Hispanic Heritage Month with Book Discussion of The Defiant: Protest Movements in Post-Liberal America

In observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, Del Mar College’s Social Sciences Department and the Mexican American Studies program present The Defiant: Protest Movements in Post-Liberal America. Dr. Dawson Barrett, assistant professor of history, will discuss his new book and call attention to the post-1960s period, in which the United States’ economic, cultural, and political elites turned the tide against the protest movement gains of the previous 40 years and reshaped the ability of activists to influence the political process. The Defiant explores the major policy shifts of this new Gilded Age through the lens of dissent—through the picket lines, protest marches, and sit-ins that greeted them at every turn. This event is free and open to the public. 

Thursday, Oct. 4, 7 p.m., Room 514, White Library, Del Mar College, East Campus, Naples at Kosar off Staples, free.

Wednesday, October 10

“…something about a piñata” at Del Mar College as Part of Hispanic Heritage Month

As part of Hispanic Heritage Month, Amorette Garza, professor of art at Del Mar College, will provide a short lecture with images of her artwork from past to present as part of “…something about a piñata: The visual process as evolution of enlightenment of cultural heritage.” Garza will share her perspective, influences and references as they reflect her personal history and cultural heritage, most specifically as a Mexican American from South Texas. She will also discuss the recent inclusion of her artwork in the Cheech Marin collection and exhibitions in which she has curated and participated. Sponsored by the DMC Art and Drama Department and the Mexican American Studies program, this event is free and open to the public. 

Wednesday, Oct. 10, 1 p.m., Room 514, White Library, Del Mar College, East Campus, Naples at Kosar off Staples, free.