The 2019 accountability ratings for school districts across Texas were released by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) Thursday morning. These are the official grades for school campuses based on how well they are educating children.

Alice, Benavides, Ben Bolt-Palito Blacno, Freer Premont, Orange Grove and San Diego Independent School Districts received “B” rating as school districts by TEA. In Nueces County, Banquete and Calallen ISDs received “A” ratings, and Agua Dulce, Robstown and Tuloso-Midway ISDs received “B” ratings.

Texas rolled out the new A-F academic accountability system last year for school districts. This is the first time individual campuses officially receive official letter grades, which are largely based on how well students performed on the STAAR tests.

Nearly 20 percent of all Texas campuses earned an A and 37 percent earned a B. Only 4.5 percent received an F, according to the preliminary ratings released by TEA.

Duval County school districts

Benavides ISD

Benavides Elementary received a “C” rating.

Benavides Secondary received a “B” rating.

Freer ISD

Norman Thomas Elementary received an “F” rating

Freer Junior High received a “C” rating and earned a distinction for comparative academic growth.

Freer High School receive a “B” rating. They earned distinctions for ELA/reading, comparative academic growth, postsecondary readiness and comparative closing the gaps.

San Diego ISD

Collins-Parr Elementary and Bernarda Jaime Junior High received “F” ratings.

San Diego High School received a “B” rating.

Jim Wells County School Districts

Alice ISD

Hillcrest Schallert Elementary and William Adams Middle School received “D” ratings.

Saenz and Noonan Elementary, Dubose Intermediate and the Alice High School received a “C” ratings.

Salazar Elementary and Memorial Intermediate received “F” ratings.

BBPB ISD

BBPB Elementary received a “C” rating with a postsecondary readiness distinction.

BBPB High School receive a “C” rating.

Premont ISD

Premont Early College Academy (elementary) received a “D” rating.

Premont Collegiate High School received a “B” rating.

Orange Grove ISD

Orange Grove Elementary and Orange Grove Intermediate received “B” ratings. Both campuses earned three distinctions each; mathematics, postsecondary readiness and comparative closing the gaps.

Orange Grove Junior High received a “D” rating and earned a distinction in science.

Orange Grove High School received a “B” rating. They earned distinctions in ELA/reading, mathematics and comparative academic growth.

Nueces County School Districts

Agua Dulce ISD

Agua Dulce Elementary received a “B” rating. They earned four distinctions; ELA/reading, mathematics, postsecondary readiness and comparative closing the gaps.

Agua Dulce High School also received a “B” rating. They earned a distinction in comparative academic growth.

Banquete ISD

Banquete Elementary received an “A” rating. They earned six distinctions; ELA/reading, mathematics, science, comparative academic growth, post secondary readiness and comparative closing the caps.

Banquete Junior High received a “B” rating. They earned four distinctions; mathematics, science, postsecondary readiness and comparative closing the gaps.

Banquete High School received a “B” ratings earning five distinctions; ELA/reading, mathematics, social studies, postsecondary readiness and comparative closing the gaps.

Calallen ISD

Magee Elementary received a “B” rating. They earned distinctions in science and comparative closing the gaps.

Calallen Wood River Elementary received an “A” rating. They earned four distinctions in ELA/reading, mathematics, postsecondary readiness and comparative closing the gaps.

Calallen East Elementary received a “B” rating and earned three distinctions; mathematics, postsecondary readiness and comparative closing the gaps.

Calallen Middle School received a “B” rating. They earned distinctions in ELA/reading, science, social studies and postsecondary readiness.

Calallen High School received an “A” rating earning four distinctions in science, social studies, comparative academic growth and comparative closing the gaps.

Robstown ISD

Robert Driscoll Junior Elementary received a “C” rating and earned a distinction in postsecondary readiness.

Loptspeich Elementary received a “C” rating. They earned three distinctions; ELA/reading, mathematics and postsecondary readiness.

San Pedro Elementary, Seale Junior High and Salazar Crossroads Academy received “D” ratings.

Solomon P. Ortiz Intermediate received a “C” rating.

Robstown Early College High School received a “B” rating and earned a distinction in comparative closing the gaps.

Tuloso-Midway ISD

Tuloso-Midway Primary and Tuloso-Midway Academic Career Center received “B” ratings.

Tuloso-Midway Middle School received a “C” rating.

Tuloso-Midway Intermediate received a “B” rating with three distinctions in ELA/reading, comparative academic growth and comparative closing the gaps.

Tuloso-Midway High School received a “B” rating with a distinction in social studies.

Texas education commissioner Mike Morath said the new grades will help communities better distinguished between good and great schools. The system is also designed so that educators can more easily identify where the most critical needs are and what successful approaches can be copied, he said.

This is the second year that Texas has awarded letter grades to school districts, and the first year for schools, replacing a previous pass/fail system. Schools last year received numeric scores that could easily be translated into grades. The grades are intended to represent students' academic performance, based on standardized test scores and other factors such as graduation rates.

For superintendents and principals, the pressure to get a good report card is high: Texas has increased the stakes of the accountability system in recent years, promising harsh penalties for schools and districts that repeatedly underperform.

Schools that fail to meet state academic standards for more than four years in a row will be forcibly shuttered or their school districts will be taken over by the state.

This year, further raising those stakes, Texas Education Commissioner Mike Morath instituted a policy change to count a "D" grade as "unacceptable" performance, which critics argue will only increase the number of schools facing state penalties.